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U.S. Lawmakers Push To Open Door For Censorship Lawsuits Against Twitter, Facebook State Legislators Are Taking On The Communications Decency Act

author image Written by: Wade Morris           Categories - In The News

Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter often remove posts that violate the sites’ rules. Now, imagine that your posts were deleted, and you could sue these companies for $75,000 per post.

That might sound absurd, but that’s what some American lawmakers are saying should be allowed to happen.

As it stands, web companies in the United States cannot be sued for removing content. These permissions are upheld by a federal law called Section 230, also known as the Communications Decency Act.

This law has been under fire for years, however – and one if its most notable critics was former President Donald Trump. Censorship on social media has been a hot topic since Twitter banned him following the Jan. 6 Capitol storming. It’s worth noting, however, that politicians of both the two main political parties in America have criticized the act for various reasons.

Many state lawmakers are trying to pass bills to allow people to sue social media sites when their posts are taken down, especially those involving politics or religion. The bills vary by state, but some allow suits for up to $75,000 per post.

It’s unknown whether these proposals have a chance of passing, but one expert says there’s a fat chance.

Len Niehoff, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School, told media outlets that the proposals are a “constitutional non-starter.”

“If an online platform wants to have a policy that it will delete certain kinds of tweets, delete certain kinds of users, forbid certain kinds of content, that is in the exercise of their right as a information distributor,” he explained. “The idea that you would create a cause of action that would allow people to sue when that happens is deeply problematic under the First Amendment.”

Wade Morris

Wade brings an energetic approach to writing – he is always on the hunt for stories and angles that matter. With years of experience in journalism and marketing environments, Wade has written about everything from politics to education. Now, he writes about SEO and digital marketing trends.

Facebook Introduces Community Chats

09/16/2022

Facebook launched a new feature for Messenger and Facebook groups called Community Chats, Metas CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, announced via a Facebook post.  The goal is to expand the chat experience to more Facebook Groups, so the feature allows you to browse chats organized by announcements, topics, events and more. That way, you can connect with your group members on a deeper level, not just via comments and posts.

The new Community Chats, previewed earlier this year as “Community chat channels,” also resemble social collaboration platforms like Slack, Teams, and Zoom’s upcoming Team Chat. Yes, Meta finding inspiration from other apps isn’t exactly news. However, the social media mogul is still unsuccessfully trying to replicate TikTok with its Instagram Reels.

Read More: Is Facebook The Boomers’ App?

Still, the chats seem to have some cool features, it doesn’t stop at texting. They offer support for audio channels as well, including up to 30 members. People can also turn on their cameras and present.

A new feature will begin testing in the “coming weeks”. Facebook will test a feature called Community Chat within Messenger, which will allow you to create a Facebook group for your casual group chat. Not all groups can access Chats now since the feature is currently only available for certain channels, but Meta says more groups will have the feature soon.

How Does It Work?

It’s on the group admins to choose from several options to help their community connect. The admins can start chats around specific topics, event chats for outings or meetups, broadcast chats for admins to announce group-wide updates or admin-only chats for collaboration with other admins. They can also create audio channels and allow group members to share live commentary.

Once in the audio channel, participants can also enable video. An example Facebook gave involves a chemistry class group. Admins of the group can create audio channels for study groups for chemistry students during finals season, and participants can turn on video for live tutoring during finals.

Read More: How to use Community Chats in Your Group

Admins also got a suite of tools that will help them manage both chat and audio experiences: blocking, muting or suspending group members, and removing members or messages, as well as Admin Assist. The latter allows admins to s

Administrators will be able to use a variety of tools to keep their communities well-maintained, including auto-moderation features that can boot members who post illegal content. They can set custom criteria that will automatically suspend users and remove reported messages, or even stop some violating videos from being sent.

So, Why Is This Beneficial?

You can start a conversation in Groups by posting and commenting, but Community Chats offers a much more effective way. Instead of waiting for comments to accumulate under a post, you can dive right into the topic right then and there and receive real-time responses from your group members.

Read More: Facebook’s Home Tab Will Be A Discovery Engine
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Facebook Launches New NFT Display Options

07/05/2022

The NFT hype is not going away anytime soon, and Meta is here to prove it. After launching NFT support on Instagram in May, Meta is launching digital collectibles support on Facebook, too. Just recently, Meta Product Manager Navdeep Singh tweeted about the launch of the new NFT display options on Facebook.

According to the screenshots he published, users can post NFTs on their timelines.  Just like within Instagram, you will be able to see the owner of the artwork, the artist behind it and a brief description of the piece.

Read More: Instagram Introduces Digital Collectibles
Photo Source: Twitter.com

How Will It Work?

Users will now be able to create custom NFT posts with a ‘Digital Collectible’ tag, and profiles will have a new section where they can show off their NFT art. Meta said that posting and sharing a digital collectible will be free of charge. However, converting digital collectible posts into ads is not allowed – yet.

The new feature is not available for all users. As was the case with Instagram in May, Facebook is starting the feature by offering it to a select group of creators in the US with a plan to expand to other regions.

Read More: Facebook’s Home Tab WIll Be A Discovery Engine

Security

Facebook will offer support for Ethereum, Polygon, and all major exchanges by using the NFT details on the public blockchain. Also, NFT owners will be able to confirm their ownership by connecting their Rainbow, Trust Wallet, and MetaMask accounts.

The company also says it’s aware of the sustainability concerns connected to NFTs. To handle that, they’ve purchased renewable energy that should reduce the emissions impact associated with digital collectibles, TechCrunch reports.

Read More: Meta Introducing New Monetization Tools For Creators

Even though the NFT sales are in a 92% decline, Meta still sees the potential of the NFT market, especially when it comes to the future of metaverse and the representation of social status it comes with.

As Social Media Today noted, it seems like Meta wants to facilitate the sale of virtual items in its apps which is why it’s experimenting so much with an NFT marketplace.

Take a look at a Twitter discussion:

Read More: Facebook Introduces Community Chats
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