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Supreme Court Justice Weighs In On Controversial Social Media Law Facebook and Twitter May Lose Power Following Section 230 Statement

author image Written by: Wade Morris           Categories - In The News, Social Media

A Supreme Court Justice has warned social media platforms Facebook and Twitter in the midst of an ongoing legal battle involving a historical law.

The law is Section 230, or the Communications Decency Act. Passed in the 1990s, the law mandates that an ‘interactive computer device’ cannot be recognized as the publisher of third-party content – in other words, websites like Facebook and Twitter are protected from lawsuits if a user posts something illegal, though some exceptions are recognized.

Section 230 has been a hot topic in American news following events that transpired over the last few months – notably, the U.S. presidential election, the Capitol riots in January, and the ongoing battle against COVID-19.

Critics of Section 230 have said that it gives social networking sites too much power and shaves off their responsibility to ensure the media shared by users is not harmful.

Among critics is former U.S. President Donald Trump. He asked regulators to change the law to make it more narrow in 2020. This happened months before platforms like Facebook and Twitter permanently banned him from using their platforms.

Current U.S. President Joe Biden is no fan of the law, either. Last year, he suggested he would remove the law.

READ MORE: U.S. Lawmakers Push to Open Door For Censorship Lawsuits Against Twitter, Facebook

Facebook And Twitter Might Be in Trouble, Suggests A Supreme Court Justice

Section 230 has been central to an ongoing Supreme Court case. Following Trump’s barring from social networking sites, the fabrics of the law reached the Supreme Court. Justice Clarence Thomas issued a statement. The statement is classified as an opinion rather than a ruling, meaning that it does not precede an actual legal outcome.

In the statement, Thomas suggests social media companies should be regulated by the government as if they were ‘common carriers’ such as phone networks. This suggests the government would be able to stop networking sites from removing users’ content without permission.

As Section 230 continues to be a highly discussed topic, the future of social media regulation and speech laws is unknown.

Wade Morris

Wade brings an energetic approach to writing – he is always on the hunt for stories and angles that matter. With years of experience in journalism and marketing environments, Wade has written about everything from politics to education. Now, he writes about SEO and digital marketing trends.

Facebook Introduces Community Chats

09/16/2022

Facebook launched a new feature for Messenger and Facebook groups called Community Chats, Metas CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, announced via a Facebook post.  The goal is to expand the chat experience to more Facebook Groups, so the feature allows you to browse chats organized by announcements, topics, events and more. That way, you can connect with your group members on a deeper level, not just via comments and posts.

The new Community Chats, previewed earlier this year as “Community chat channels,” also resemble social collaboration platforms like Slack, Teams, and Zoom’s upcoming Team Chat. Yes, Meta finding inspiration from other apps isn’t exactly news. However, the social media mogul is still unsuccessfully trying to replicate TikTok with its Instagram Reels.

Read More: Is Facebook The Boomers’ App?

Still, the chats seem to have some cool features, it doesn’t stop at texting. They offer support for audio channels as well, including up to 30 members. People can also turn on their cameras and present.

A new feature will begin testing in the “coming weeks”. Facebook will test a feature called Community Chat within Messenger, which will allow you to create a Facebook group for your casual group chat. Not all groups can access Chats now since the feature is currently only available for certain channels, but Meta says more groups will have the feature soon.

How Does It Work?

It’s on the group admins to choose from several options to help their community connect. The admins can start chats around specific topics, event chats for outings or meetups, broadcast chats for admins to announce group-wide updates or admin-only chats for collaboration with other admins. They can also create audio channels and allow group members to share live commentary.

Once in the audio channel, participants can also enable video. An example Facebook gave involves a chemistry class group. Admins of the group can create audio channels for study groups for chemistry students during finals season, and participants can turn on video for live tutoring during finals.

Read More: How to use Community Chats in Your Group

Admins also got a suite of tools that will help them manage both chat and audio experiences: blocking, muting or suspending group members, and removing members or messages, as well as Admin Assist. The latter allows admins to s

Administrators will be able to use a variety of tools to keep their communities well-maintained, including auto-moderation features that can boot members who post illegal content. They can set custom criteria that will automatically suspend users and remove reported messages, or even stop some violating videos from being sent.

So, Why Is This Beneficial?

You can start a conversation in Groups by posting and commenting, but Community Chats offers a much more effective way. Instead of waiting for comments to accumulate under a post, you can dive right into the topic right then and there and receive real-time responses from your group members.

Read More: Facebook’s Home Tab Will Be A Discovery Engine
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Facebook Launches New NFT Display Options

07/05/2022

The NFT hype is not going away anytime soon, and Meta is here to prove it. After launching NFT support on Instagram in May, Meta is launching digital collectibles support on Facebook, too. Just recently, Meta Product Manager Navdeep Singh tweeted about the launch of the new NFT display options on Facebook.

According to the screenshots he published, users can post NFTs on their timelines.  Just like within Instagram, you will be able to see the owner of the artwork, the artist behind it and a brief description of the piece.

Read More: Instagram Introduces Digital Collectibles
Photo Source: Twitter.com

How Will It Work?

Users will now be able to create custom NFT posts with a ‘Digital Collectible’ tag, and profiles will have a new section where they can show off their NFT art. Meta said that posting and sharing a digital collectible will be free of charge. However, converting digital collectible posts into ads is not allowed – yet.

The new feature is not available for all users. As was the case with Instagram in May, Facebook is starting the feature by offering it to a select group of creators in the US with a plan to expand to other regions.

Read More: Facebook’s Home Tab WIll Be A Discovery Engine

Security

Facebook will offer support for Ethereum, Polygon, and all major exchanges by using the NFT details on the public blockchain. Also, NFT owners will be able to confirm their ownership by connecting their Rainbow, Trust Wallet, and MetaMask accounts.

The company also says it’s aware of the sustainability concerns connected to NFTs. To handle that, they’ve purchased renewable energy that should reduce the emissions impact associated with digital collectibles, TechCrunch reports.

Read More: Meta Introducing New Monetization Tools For Creators

Even though the NFT sales are in a 92% decline, Meta still sees the potential of the NFT market, especially when it comes to the future of metaverse and the representation of social status it comes with.

As Social Media Today noted, it seems like Meta wants to facilitate the sale of virtual items in its apps which is why it’s experimenting so much with an NFT marketplace.

Take a look at a Twitter discussion:

Read More: Facebook Introduces Community Chats
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