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Google Updating Site Diversity in Search Results

author image Written by: Lia           Categories - In The News

Fewer Duplicate Root Domains in Most Search Listings

Google’s Search Liaison Danny Sullivan has announced that Google implemented a “change” to reduce duplicate site listings in search results to show a more diverse selection of websites. If you’ve ever been frustrated seeing a single site dominate several prime rankings on a single page, it seems as though this change is designed to address that. Sullivan’s tweet thread announcing the change mentions that this change will, in most cases, limit things so that users won’t see more than 2 listings from the same website in Google’s top results: https://twitter.com/searchliaison/status/1136739062843432960 He also provided a few technical details, including that subdomains will generally be treated as part of a root domain. However, Google will also treat subdomains as “separate sites for diversity purposes when deemed relevant to do so.” The key term here is “relevant.” Understanding this term in the context of the user is vital to understanding how Google assesses relevancy; it’s easy to focus on how a page relates to a keyword thus lose sight of its role in overall user experience. This site diversity change began on June 3, 2019. Sullivan stressed that this change isn’t an update and thus isn’t part of the June 2019 Core Update, and does not affect how Google ranks websites.

Lia

Big Announcements Made During Google Search On 2021 Event

10/01/2021

The Google Search On 2021 event is in full swing, and in typical Google fashion, some big announcements were made by the search engine.

For those who are unfamiliar, Google Search On is an annual event hosted by the search engine where big announcements related to the future of search take place.

From changes to the Google Search experience to improvements to MUM, here is a breakdown of some of the biggest announcements to come out of this year’s event.

MUM’s the Word

One of the biggest takeaways from Search On so far is that Google has redesigned Google Search and added some cool new features. These features are designed to enable more natural, intuitive ways to search through “advanced AI systems like MUM.” This includes:

  • Things to know
  • New search refinements
  • Visually browsable result pages
  • And more

MUM will also be used to gain a deeper understanding of videos in Google Search.

Google announced a new MUM-based experience that will be used to recognize related topics in a video, even in cases where a topic is not directly mentioned. This will be launched in English Google search results in the next few weeks.

“Things To Know”

Google is launching a new “Things to Know” feature. Here’s how they explained it:

“When you search for a topic, like acrylic painting, you can see all the different dimensions people typically search for, and find the path that’s right for you.”

Google will use this to come up with additional details and determine the appropriate categories for a topic. When a user clicks on these, Google will show a featured snippet for that option and give them the ability to click on and see more results.

Shoppable Google Search Experience

In the U.S., Google is launching a new “shoppable search experience” that makes it simpler to shop on mobile directly within Search results.

Here is an example of what this will look like: When a user searches for “cropped jackets, a visual feed of jackets in different colours and styles along with information like local shops, style guides, and videos will appear in Search results.

Of course, plenty more announcements were made that we can’t even begin to get into here. For all of the big announcements, check out https://searchon.withgoogle.com/

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Google Clarifies How It Obtains Automotive Data For Search

09/23/2021

Yesterday, we reported that auto industry folk weren’t too pleased about a new Google Search feature that displayed car specs in search results. Now, Google has clarified where exactly this data comes from and confirmed that it does not source it from the open web.

After our original article was published, the topic came up again on Twitter when Search Engine Round Table reporter Barry Schwartz tagged Google’s Public Search Liason Danny Sullivan in response to someone asking where Google sources its automotive data from.

Here is Sullivan’s response:

“We license the data shown. It’s not coming from schema or pages on the open web.”

As we reported yesterday, several SEOs involved in the automotive industry were not pleased that it appeared as if Google was sourcing data from automotive websites without stating where the data came from. One of the main concerns was that Google may have been “stealing” traffic from these sites without directing users back to the source.

READ MORE: New Car Spec Feature in Google Search Causes Uproar in Automotive Industry

Now, we know that this isn’t the case. Based on Sullivan’s comments, we can conclude that Google actually licenses this data and therefore pays to use it. This means that Google does not need to state where it obtained the data. This is similar to how Google licenses weather data.

So, there you have it. We’re glad that this one was cleared up and all the confusion can be put to bed.

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